inktober52: river (part 2)

“I didn’t hear you say that. Because it isn’t possible. It’s inhuman to serve the same food, day after day. The Geneva Convention prohibits the killing of our taste buds! I simply cannot eat the same food every day! Fish! Liver! Day after day! I’ve eaten a river of liver and an ocean of fish! I’ve eaten so much fish, I’m ready to grow gills! I’ve eaten so much liver, I can only make love if I’m smothered in bacon and onions!”

— Hawkeye Pierce, after being served liver of fish for eleven day in a row
“Adam’s Ribs,” Season 3, Episode 11
M*A*S*H

Comments

comments

DCS: wilma mankiller

The sixth of eleven children, Wilma Mankiller was born in 1945 in Oklahoma. Her father was a full-blooded Cherokee. Her mother was of Dutch and English heritage. Wilma grew up in her family’s ancestral home — without running water, electricity or telephones. In an act that echoed her family’s history, the Mankillers were moved to San Francisco under the federal government’s Bureau of Indian Affairs’ relocation policy. Wilma reflected upon this as her own “Trail of Tears,” referencing her paternal ancestors’ forced relocation under a similar governmental edict in the 1830s.

At 24, Wilma’s life was changed by the rebellious actions of group of Native Americans who took over the federal penitentiary on Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay and laid claim to it by ‘right of discovery’ to expose the suffering of American Indians. She was awakened to the mistreatment of Native Americans and dedicated her life to working for Native American rights. As director of the Oakland’s Native American Youth Center, Wilma personally fought for California’s Pit River tribe in its legal land battle with Pacific Gas and Electric.

In 1977, after a divorce, Wilma and her two daughters moved back to Oklahoma. She founded the Community Development Department for the Cherokee Nation. The organization campaigned for access to water and housing for Native Americans. She became a voice of the Cherokee Nation, working for better healthcare, housing and education. In 1985, she was elected Chief of the Cherokee Nation — the first woman to hold the esteemed position. Under her leadership, the Cherokee Nation flourished — including a budget that ballooned to $150 million annually from revenue from gaming, hospitality, natural resources and other Native American-operated businesses.

Wilma was named Ms. Magazine’s “Woman of the Year” in 1987. She was inducted into the Woman’s Hall of Fame in 1993 and was awarded the the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Bill Clinton ion 1998. She was asked to contribute a pair of shoes to a Native American art exhibit. She sent an ordinary pair of shoes, saying these were the shoes she wore everywhere.

Wilma passed away in 2010 at the age of 64. Her funeral was attended by government officials, women’s rights activists, Cherokee Nation dignitaries and multitudes of people she had inspired.

Comments

comments

DCS: marjorie daw

When her parents died, teen-age Marjorie House took over the responsibility to support her younger brother and sister. Taking the name “Marjorie Daw” from a popular children’s story, she pursued an acting career. With much determination, she was successful.

Marjorie appeared in 76 films between 1914 and 1929. Along the way, she had a brief marriage in 1923. In 1929, she married again, this time to Myron Selznick, a film executive and brother of producer David O. Selznick. When silent pictures fell of out of fashion with the popularity of “talkies,” Marjorie called it a career. She lived quietly and happily out of the spotlight until 1979 when she passed away at the age of 77.

Comments

comments

DCS: charles haeger

Charles Haeger had a pretty unremarkable baseball career. In six years, he played for three different teams, regularly moving from the minor leagues to the majors. His pitching was erratic, with good games followed by early exits from the mound after a shelling. He called it a career in 2010 with a 2-7 record, but remained hopeful as he continued to bounce around the minor leagues. Eventually he became a pitching coach for Madonna University in Livonia, Michigan. He worked as a pitching coordinator in Tampa’s farm system and planned to coach for the Cubs’ AA team when the 2020 season was sidelined due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

On Friday October 2, 2020, police were called to the Scottsdale, Arizona apartment where Danielle Breed lived with a roommate. Her roommate heard gunshots and witnessed Charles coming out of Breed’s room holding a handgun. He pointed the gun at the roommate before quickly exiting the apartment.  Officers discovered Breed had been shot to death. An interview with Breed’s mother revealed that her daughter was planning on getting a restraining order against Charles because of recent harassment.

Scottsdale authorities issued a warning regarding Charles, saying that he was to be considered armed and dangerous.  On Saturday morning, October 3, police found Charles’ minivan over 100 miles away in Flagstaff. Later in the afternoon, Charles was found dead from a self-inflicted gunshot along a trail at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. He was 37 years old.

Comments

comments

DCS: joan shawlee

dancing queen

As a teenager, Joan Shawlee had aspirations to become a ballet dancer. In her 20s, she was appearing in Broadway productions. She made the jump to films, with roles in a number of Jack Lemmon/Billy Wilder vehicles. Joan played band member “Sweet Sue” in Some Like It Hot, “Sylvia” in The Apartment and “Amazon Annie” in Irma la Douce. She even appeared in Wilder’s final film, Buddy Buddy.

Joan enjoyed a abundance of guest roles on television, including three times as “Pickles Sorrell,” the usually unseen wife of comedy writer “Buddy” (played by Morey Amsterdam) on The Dick Van Dyke Show.

In the early 1960s, Joan teamed up with writer-comedian Mitzi McCall for a nightclub act. The strikingly tall Joan (at 5’9″) was a noticeable contrast to the short McCall (4’10”), causing entertainment columnist Dorothy Kilgallen to note the pair “caused quite a stir.”

Joan was diagnosed with breast cancer and passed away in 1987 at the age of 61, leaving behind a successful career that lasted forty years.

Comments

comments

DCS: dino bravo

Italian-born Adolfo Bresciano began his professional wrestling career in Canada the 1970s. Using the name “Dino Bravo,” he joined up with various organized wrestling alliances, becoming one of Canada’s most popular wrestlers. With his flamboyant manner, his bleached blond hair, his trademark fleur-de-lis gauntlets and his “pro-Canada” bravado, he was a fan favorite. He worked with the mighty WWF (now WWE) group as part of a tag-team with Dominic DeNucci. In the early 1980s, Dino was scheduled for a title match against the renowned Hulk Hogan. The match was to be held in Montreal, Dino’s adopted hometown. But the match was soon canceled, as promoters didn’t want hometown fans to cheer for Dino.

Dino retired from the ring in 1992 and began working with a notorious Canadian crime syndicate. Dino confided to several colleagues that he believed his days were numbered. He was allegedly involved in a risky and dangerous racket of cigarette smuggling. On March 10, 1993, Dino was found dead in his Quebec home. He was hit with at least 17 bullets and the surrounding walls were riddled with additional evidence of gunfire. Dino was 44 years old. His murder remains unsolved.

Comments

comments