DCS: audre lorde

pride

Audre Lorde was a writer and civil rights activist. As a poet, she is best known for her extremely expressive style. Her poems express anger and outrage at the civil and social injustices she observed throughout her life. The overall themes of her poetry and prose focused largely on issues related to civil rights, feminism, lesbianism, and the exploration of black female identity.

In 1992, Audre died of liver cancer at the age of 58. In an African naming ceremony just before her death, Audre took the name “Gamba Adisa,” which means “Warrior: She Who Makes Her Meaning Known.”

 

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IF: mountains

first there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is

“I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made straight and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”

— Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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DCS: sylvia rivera

pride

Sylvia Rivera was a pioneering advocate for civil rights. She, and her friend Marsha Johnson, co-founded Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries, a group to help homeless gay youth on the streets of New York City. Sylvia fought hard for the Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act in New York. The Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in employment, housing, public accommodations, education, credit, and the exercise of civil rights.

It is a long-standing belief that Sylvia threw one of the first bottles at the Stonewall Riots in 1969. She never stopped her fight for righteousness.

Sylvia passed away in 2002 at the age of 50.

 

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DCS: freddie starr

opportunity knocks

Freddie Starr, leading his Mersey Beat group The Midnighters, set out for fame in the early 60s. Despite being represented by Beatles manager Brian Epstein and having singles produced by music impresario Joe Meek, Freddie could not catch a break. It wasn’t until an appearance on the British talent show Opportunity Knocks that Freddie’s popularity took off.

Freddie hosted his own BBC show and performed in nightclubs all over England. His impressions of Mick Jagger and Elvis Presley had audiences rolling in the aisles. But, thanks to a little manipulative publicity, Freddie would become infamous.

On March 13, 1986, The Sun, the British equivalent of the National Enquirer, splashed this headline across its front page: “Freddie Starr Ate My Hamster.” According to the story, Freddie had been staying at the home of his friend Vince McCaffrey and his 23-year-old girlfriend Lea LaSalle.  Freddie had returned to his friend’s apartment following a performance at a Manchester nightclub in the early hours of the morning. He demanded that Lea LaSalle make him a sandwich. When she refused, he allegedly went into the kitchen and put her pet hamster between two slices of bread and proceeded to eat it. The story was made up by Freddie’s publicist as a joke, but it took on a life of its own. It had an unusual effect on Freddie’s career. The story seemed to boost the demand for tickets for his live performances. Freddie, of course, denied the incident, stating, “I have never eaten or even nibbled a live hamster, gerbil, guinea pig, mouse, shrew, vole or any other small mammal.” The story followed Freddie for the rest of his life.

Freddie passed away on May 9, 2019 at the age of 76. The Sun followed suit and headlined his obituary with: “Freddie Starr Joins His Hamster.”

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IF: breakfast (part 4)

life is a kabaret

And now, Kelloggs proudly presents a show that has the whole town-cooking!

A-speaking of meat, let’s tell them what happened down at the chicken coop, eh?
A hungry fox boldly walked in through a hen house door.
Too bad for him, he met a hen, who stood at ten foot four!
He won’t forget the lickin’.
He got from that big chicken.
Now he gets his poultry from the store!

I love breakfast. I’ve done a few drawings based on breakfast, as well as several blog posts on the subject. You can see them all here

Drawings: Breakfast 1  •  Breakfast 2  •  Breakfast 3

Blog posts: Breakfast in America  •  Come On-a My House  •  Say My Name, Say My Name, Say My Stupid Name

 

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DCS: larri thomas

Winds in the east, mist coming in. Like somethin' is brewin' and 'bout to begin.

Larri Thomas started her career as a dancer and actress, nabbing a few roles in various television commercials. She was chosen by noted film producer Samuel Goldwyn to be one of his “Goldwyn Girls.” Larri was one of six young ladies who performed on a promotional tour for the big-screen version of the musical Guys and Dolls. She even had a brief, but uncredited, appearance in the movie. Later, Larri served as actress Julie Andrews’s double in The Sound of Music and in Mary Poppins, in which she performed some of the character’s flying scenes. She also appeared on The Dean Martin Show.

Larri was briefly married to actor John Bromfield, star of the syndicated crime drama Sheriff of Cochise. In the 1960s, she had a relationship with baseball manager Leo Durocher.

In the early 70s, Larri landed a role in the children’s television series New Zoo Revue. Larri played the costumed character “Henrietta Hippo” on the show.

After retiring from show business, Larri and her second husband participated in charity events. On October 20, 2013, Larri died from injuries she suffered in a fall at her California Home. She was 81.

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IF: throne

game of throne

Malachi Throne was a busy guy in the 60s and 70s. The veteran actor had roles in nearly every popular TV series. He was featured in Westerns like The Big Valley and The Virginian. He was in science fiction shows like Star Trek, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and Lost in Space. He had multiple appearances in dramas like Judd for the Defense, It Takes a Thief and Ben Casey. He even took roles in shows aimed at children, playing “Ali Baba” in Sid and Marty Krofft’s Electra Woman and Dyna Girl and narrating Lancelot Link Secret Chimp.

After just a few episodes, Batman, starring Adam West, was bona fide hit. The camp comic book series featured big-name Hollywood actors as “Special Guest Villains,” with new names clamoring for the coveted roles each week. (Frank Sinatra allegedly wanted to play The Joker.) On March 10, 1966, ABC broadcast episode eighteen of the first season of Batman. The featured villain was “False Face,” a dastardly nemesis who sported a translucent face mask, just opaque enough to conceal the actor’s identity. In the opening credits, a big question mark appeared in place of the actor’s name. It wasn’t until the episode’s conclusion that the name “Malachi Throne” was revealed. Malachi appeared in the next episode (and was defeated by the Caped Crusader) but, unlike many other “villains,” the character of “False Face” was never seen on the series again. Perhaps because Malachi Throne was furious with the producers over his denial of proper screen in the show’s opening.

Malachi, however, continued to be an in-demand actor and narrator well into the 90s and 2000s. He passed away in 2013 at the age of 84.

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DCS: tim conway

13WKS

Tim Conway was a funny guy. Unfortunately, Hollywood had a difficult time placing him in just the right vehicle to showcase his talent for comedy. Sure, he had a successful run playing second fiddle to Academy Award-winning actor Ernest Borgnine on McHale’s Navy, but Tim’s own variety show was cancelled after the standard 13 weeks, as was a subsequent series, also bearing the title The Tim Conway Show. In addition, he was the one and only guest star on the one and only episode of Turn On, a Laugh-In rip-off conceived by Laugh-In creator George Schlatter. Tim was featured in supporting roles in several Disney films with his pal Don Knotts.

It wasn’t until 1975, when he joined the regular cast of The Carol Burnett Show after numerous guest appearances, that Tim found his niche. He enjoyed his greatest success with Carol and company…. especially costar Harvey Korman.

Tim Conway passed away in May 2019 at the age of 85. He really was a funny guy.

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